Tide Mills

You may have noticed that there's lots going on at Tide Mills, preparing for 5 days of free live events,...
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We need your memories!

We need your memories!

Were you in Seaford on V.E. Day? If you were, we would love you to send us your memories and...
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We have reopened!

We have reopened!

We are delighted to say that we have reopened the Museum! We are still operating under Covid-19 restrictions - face...
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Our 50th Anniversary Year

Our 50th Anniversary Year

Our 50th Anniversary year was in 2020, but none of our special events or celebrations could go ahead due to...
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The Museum is on YouTube!

The Museum is on YouTube!

Lawrence Chowen is a third year documentary film making student from Seaford and he has produced an excellent film about...
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We are delighted to say that we have now reopened the Museum! Subject to Covid-19 restrictions, we are welcoming visitors on Wednesday afternoons, and Saturdays and Sundays throughout the summer. Please see our Opening Hours on the Visit Us page, or our Facebook page.

The Society

Are you interested in the extraordinary history of Seaford? If so, the Heritage Society is the organisation for you.
Earliest known photograph of the Tower, taken around 1840

Tower History

Built to ward off the threat of invasion by Napoleon over 200 years ago, the Tower is one of the few that are open to the public.
The Martello Cannon

Support Us

Find out how you can help us bring history to life with the Heritage Societies fantastic exhibitions and calendar of events.
Lawrence Chowen is a third year documentary film making student from Seaford and he has produced an excellent film about Seaford Museum, the Tower and the people involved.

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Seaford Museum & Heritage Society

3 days 4 hours ago

Battle of Trafalgar
The White Ensign is being flown today to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805. It consists of a red St George's Cross on a white field with the Union Flag in the upper canton. The White Ensign was one of three ensigns in use into the 19th Century, with each one being assigned to one of the three squadrons of the Navy, according to its colour (red, white and blue), with red being the most senior and blue the least. Ships flew the colour of ensign corresponding to the squadron to which they were attached, which was in turn determined by the seniority of the admiral under whose command the ship sailed. In 1864 the White Ensign was adopted as the ensign used by all Royal Navy ships and shore stations. The Red Ensign was allocated to merchantmen. The Blue Ensign was to be the flag of ships in public service or commanded by an officer in the Royal Naval Reserve,
Royal Navy ships and submarines wear the White Ensign at all times when underway. The White Ensign may also be worn on a gaff, and may be shifted to the starboard yardarm when at sea. When alongside, the White Ensign is worn at the stern, with the Union Flag flown as a jack at the bow, during daylight hours. The White Ensign is worn at the mastheads when Royal Navy ships are dressed on special occasions such as the Queen's birthday.
This sea battle was fought between the British Royal Navy and the combined fleets of the French Navy and Spanish Navy, during the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815). The British ships flew Nelson’s White Ensign from HMS Victory.
The battle was the most decisive British naval victory of the war. Twenty-seven British ships of the line led by Admiral Lord Nelson aboard HMS Victory defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships of the line under French Admiral Pierre Villeneuve off the south-west coast of Spain, just west of Cape Trafalgar. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships, without a single British vessel being lost. In his greatest battle Nelson lost his life, but not before knowing that the victory was his.
The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the past century and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from the prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy, which involved engaging an enemy fleet in a single line of battle parallel to the enemy to facilitate signalling in battle and disengagement, and to maximise fields of fire and target areas. Nelson instead divided his smaller force into two columns directed perpendicularly against the larger enemy fleet, with decisive results, Admiral Collingwood leading the leeward column. The Royal Navy dominated the world’s oceans for the next hundred years.
In 1808, because the threat of invasion by the French was removed, it was decided not to build any more Martello Towers, which is why this one, number 74, is the last constructed and the two more planned for Seaford Bay were never built.